Thursday, April 5, 2012

Echo

In the phonetic alphabet, Echo represents the letter E. The definition of echo - per my ever so reliable American Heritage Dictionary - is 1. Repetition of a sound by reflection of sound waves from a surface 2. The sound produced in this manner 3. Any repetition or imitation of something, as of the opinions, speech, or dress of another. Twins often echo one another, for example.

In Greek Mythology, Echo was a nymph whose unrequited love for Narcissus caused her to pine away until nothing but her voice remained.

37 comments:

  1. What a coincidence. I just finished writing a footnote for a poem I wrote about this myth :o)

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    1. I'd be interested in reading the poem. Are you posting it?

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  2. In my teen year, I was deep into mythology. This tale isn't one I've heard. Thanks.

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    1. Yes, it's one of the lesser known myths. But I have a few books that are helpful (as you might imagine).

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  3. This is great. What an interesting selection for E. Thanks for sharing this.

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    1. It wasn't planned. I sort of chose the most interesting thing about the word - in this case echo.

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  4. Poor Echo!!! I feel so sorry for her - esp as her voice is still around!! Take care
    x

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    1. Oh yes, lots of sadness in Greek mythology.

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  5. I didn't know this Echo tale...

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    1. I did, but I didn't think of it right away when I wrote down the word echo.

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  6. Thanks for sharing the myth of Echo!...:)JP

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    1. you are welcome! Thanks for stopping by!

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  7. I didn't know that about Echo. Cool. Sounds like The Little Mermaid.

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    1. Does it? I actually don't know that story very well. Something about a mermaid falling in love with a human?

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  8. I think echoes are magical. Cool choice of word.
    Karen

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  9. Great post! Echoes can also bemistaken for ghosts.

    Shelly
    http://secondhandshoesnovel.blogspot.com/

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    1. yes, that's one I didn't think of. Thanks for coming by :)

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  10. such a contrast between the beautiful sounds of an echo and the story....

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  11. The story of Echo in Greek mythology is my very favorite. Awesome awesome post!

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  12. I always thought the story of Echo was rather sad . . . though I guess a lot of Greek myths are that way.

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    1. I think they are - sad that is. or tragic in some way. no happy endings.

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  13. Great post! The story of Echo is so sad, and I usually think of her almost before I think of what the word means.

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  14. I'm learning more and more regarding various mythos and this is one that seems so sad. I mean, talk about some serious in-love-ness going on yet to never have it reciprocated. Pining so hard, so deep that only her voice remains, an Echo of her undying love.

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  15. Love the word Echo. Beautiful new picture too!

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    1. thank you tracy :) I took in Florida, Leu Gardens.

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  16. The Greeks really came up with some depressing, tragic stories, didn't they?

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    1. yes, but they were good depressing, tragic stories.

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  17. Ooh, I like your new picture.

    So sad about Echo.

    I just used this word today in my writing. (my characters are in a canyon) :)

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  18. Doesn't the word come from the mythological story? I'm trying to visit all the A-Z Challenge Blogs this month.

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  19. She should have realised that Narcissus was interested in someone else entirely ;)


    Jamie Gibbs
    Fellow A-Z buddy
    Mithril Wisdom

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